The Electric Chris Rodriguez

The fact that Chris Rodriguez is even in the majors is a success story. The fact that he’s succeeding at a high level is that much more amazing.

Rodriguez was the Angels fourth-round pick in the 2016 MLB Draft, a classic high school pitcher with big stuff but plenty of risk. After the draft, Rodriguez flashed strong stuff and command to boot in a short 11 1/3-inning stint in Rookie Ball, allowing two earned runs, striking out 17, and walking three batters. Heading into 2017, Rodriguez was a sneaky, under-the-radar prospect in a barren Angels farm system and projected as one of the only real impact MLB arms in the system.

After 57 hit-or-miss innings in 2017 (6.16 ERA, 56:14 strikeout-to-walk ratio), Rodriguez underwent a stretch of injuries that wiped out his entire 2018 season and pretty much the entire 2019 season (9 1/3 innings). A series of back injuries, including surgery in 2019, and the pandemic season of 2020 meant we saw Rodriguez throw fewer than 10 professional innings in three seasons. Suffice to say, the odds of a pitcher going through this many injuries, missing that much time, and not making it past High-A ball have slim chances to make the majors.

That’s exactly what Rodriguez did, however. After throwing an estimated 70 innings in 2020, either at the alternate site or in Arizona, Rodriguez entered camp this year as a sneaky candidate to make an impact in 2021. And while many thought he could find his way up at some point, I’m not sure anybody realistically expected him to break camp with the club out of the bullpen. Again, that’s exactly what Rodriguez did and he has more than earned his spot in the majors.

Through the first 11 1/3 innings of his MLB career, Rodriguez has a 3.18 ERA along with a 31.4 strikeout percentage and 2.64 Expected ERA (based on quality and quantity of contact against him). Rodriguez has established himself as a trusted multi-inning reliever who has bridged the gap between a shaky Angels rotation and back-end of the bullpen. The sheer stuff and ability to miss bats, induce weak contact, and go multiple innings makes him one of the most valuable arms on a questionable Angels pitching staff.

To get a better idea of just how good Rodriguez might be, let’s explore some of the characteristics that make him one of the dynamic arms not just for the Angels but in all of Major League Baseball.

The rare sinker/curveball characteristics

Rodriguez relies heavily on a sinker/curveball combination that he’s used nearly 90 percent of the time. There’s a good reason for it, too.

Rodriguez’s upper-90’s sinker and mid-80’s breaking ball aren’t just thrown hard; they also have movement that pretty much make him a unicorn. As evidenced here, there are only three other MLB pitchers who currently have the combination of both velocity and movement on a sinker/breaking ball combination.

That’s some pretty good company to be in. What helps the sinker/curveball even more is the way that these pitches spin. To keep this as simple as possible, Rodriguez “mirrors” his sinker and curveball well. That is, the sinker and curveball have spin that moves in the complete opposite direction. Think about this like a clock: a 12 o’clock pitch will mirror well with a 6 o’clock pitch while a 2 o’clock pitch will mirror well with an 8 o’clock pitch. You can read more about this in-depth in a January MLB.com article from Mike Petriello.

In Rodriguez’s case, he pretty much has the perfect spin mirroring with his sinker/curveball combination. The sinker spins at 1:30 while the curveball spins at 7:30.

What this all means is Rodriguez has extremely uncanny characteristics with his sinker and curveball, in terms of velocity, movement, and deception. These two pitches alone are nasty but he has a few other pitches that make him even more interesting.

The four-pitch mix

As mentioned above, he’s throwing the sinker/curveball pretty much all the time. He’s also mixing in a hard slider and change-up a combined 10 percent of the time. Rodriguez has always had a potential starters package not just because of the sheer stuff and above-average strike-throwing ability but also because of his four-pitch mix. I’d venture to guess that we’ll see these two other pitches thrown more often as he gets more reps.

The slider and change-up, too, have some fun characteristics that are unique. The slider is interesting because it operates more like a hard cutter (90 mph) with extra movement. It’s almost a hybrid of the slider/cutter but has the characteristics to be effective, Meanwhile, only nine pitchers throw a harder change-up (90 mph) and he gets decent movement while doing so.

Add it all up and you get some fun comparisons in terms of each individual pitch.

A four-pitch mix like this is extremely exciting for the short-term prospects for both Rodriguez and the Angels. It’s even more exciting when you see the results he’s getting and the possibility of him being a starter long-term.

The success and the starter/reliever dilemma

There’s pretty much no question that Rodriguez is a MLB-caliber arm, based on what we’ve touched on here. The numbers are all there and Rodriguez is doing so from numerous perspectives. It’s not just the sheer swing-and-miss stuff Rodriguez possesses; he also generates a ton of weak contact on the ground. To have MLB success, there’s a good chance that you need strikeout stuff, strong command, or an ability to limit hard contact. Rodriguez is doing two of those things at a high level right now.

Rodriguez is one of four pitchers this year (minimum 10 innings) who have at least a 60 percent ground-ball rate and a 30 percent strikeout rate. The others: Tejay Antone, Shohei Ohtani, and Garrett Whitlock. Those are some fun names, given Antone’s Statcast prowess, Ohtani’s ace-caliber stuff, and Whitlock’s zero earned runs in his first 11 1/3 MLB innings. Rodriguez is more than earning it with a whiff rate in 66th percentile and barrel rate in the 82nd percentile.

This leads to the question of what to do with Rodriguez from here. On one hand, Rodriguez clearly has the repertoire to make it work as a starter and is now a few years removed from the injuries. The Angels, obviously, could use a starting pitcher of Rodriguez’s caliber. The 13.7 walk percentage is something he’ll need to clean up but not something that would prevent him from attempting to start. On the other hand, he’s a 22-year-old with a long injury history and has already shown an ability to handle an important multi-inning relief role.

The cop-out answer or simple solution might be something in the middle. The Angels don’t have to commit to either role now or in the long-term, really. Rodriguez could operate as a swingman, pitching multi-inning outings out of the bullpen and starting a few games by giving the club 3-5 innings. Baseball has trended in this direction for a while and based on Rodriguez’s dilemma, he could be the perfect pitcher to slide into that role. He could, theoretically, give you 75-100 innings a season in this type of role. With that kind of arm, there could be some serious impact for the Angels.

Regardless of what role he ends up in, Chris Rodriguez is here to stay and that’s a major success story in itself. After barely throwing any professional innings for three seasons, Rodriguez is now firmly in the conversation for high-leverage innings on a competitive Angels club. It’s a fun story now and should be a fun one to follow for the years to follow.

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benjiface
Member
16 days ago

Another great article Brent. Love this kid!

Cowboy26
Trusted Member
17 days ago

I like the way he spins away from home plate after throwing a third strike. Definitely better dance moves than Mike Caposio’s

Last edited 17 days ago by Cowboy26
TheOrangeCurtain
Trusted Member
16 days ago
Reply to  Cowboy26

Ugh I hate those car dealership commercials. So frickin annoying.

Fansince1971
Super Member
17 days ago

Good timing on this article! He was really good last night.

ihearhowie3.0
Trusted Member
17 days ago

Really impressed so far. Hopefully they get him doing yoga or something to keep his back right.

Jessica DeLine
Admin
Trusted Member
17 days ago

Love this dude. His stuff and composure are excellent. He’s the type of starting pitcher we’ve been waiting for. Home grown, solid, front line starter. I really hope they convert him later this year or at least to start 2022. If the Angels actually make the playoffs, Bundy/Ohtani/CRod/Heaney is a pretty good post season rotation.

benjiface
Member
16 days ago
Reply to  Jessica DeLine

Exactly. Time to move Rodríguez to the starting rotation…like…now

TheOrangeCurtain
Trusted Member
16 days ago
Reply to  benjiface

The guy isn’t going to the rotation this year. Maybe a spot start or “opener” type situation, but hasn’t been stretched out and built up endurance to throw 160-180 innings as a starter. 3 years of injuries and non-work… He only got 70-some last season at the alternate site, and maybe they’ll work him up to a 100 or so this year. 2022, sure maybe he’ll be ready for the rotation full-time.

angelslogic
Trusted Member
16 days ago

He needs to open for Ohtani, who is allergic to first-inning pitching.

angelslogic
Trusted Member
17 days ago

It sure is a refreshing change to read a success story about an Angels relief pitcher. That’s about as rare as a Josh Hamilton head-first slide into first base. C-Rod is just what the ailing bullpen needed.

h27kim
Member
18 days ago

So far, pretty impressed. Still worried that things may get derailed b/c he got too rushed, especially considering all the development time he lost due to injuries, though.

FungoAle
Trusted Member
18 days ago

Great post Brent, nice work. Excited about an arm like this and nice find Billy Eppler.

If I was GM, send him to the minors and stretch him out. More value as a starter and in a short playoff series. Setting the tempo from the first pitch of the game is critical.

Jeff Joiner
Editor
Super Member
18 days ago

Rodriguez threw 70 innings last year. Just guesstimating here that the team would like to push that to about 100, maybe 120 this year to truly give themselves the option of having him start next year.

He’s only at 11.1 so far this year and probably will be in the upper 20s at the end of May. He always gets a couple of days between appearances.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see him start the second half of the year. 50 innings out of the bullpen until the All Star break, 10 starts at 5ish innings each over the second half.

red floyd
Super Member
18 days ago

I prefer the Acoustic Chris Rodriguez.

steelgolf
Trusted Member
18 days ago
Reply to  red floyd

I prefer the Electric Chris Rodriguez over the Acoustic Jose Quintana. Jose Quintana is like the Jack Johnson or Donavon Frankenreiter of music. I just know I’m in for disappointment.

tanana40
Trusted Member
16 days ago
Reply to  red floyd

Things have not been the same since his performance at the Newport Jazz Festival.

halofansince1978
Member
18 days ago

My solar guy Sonny called it on C-Rod this spring…dead on!!!

halofansince1978
Member
18 days ago

Forgot to say Sonny showed up with an Angels face mask on.

I knew pretty much right then his company would get the job.

Jeff Joiner
Editor
Super Member
18 days ago

You have solid hiring practices.

halofansince1978
Member
18 days ago
Reply to  Jeff Joiner

And I told him to log on here!!!

Eric_in_Portland
Super Member
18 days ago

we’ve been talking about him for so long it’s hard to believe he’s still only 22.

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