Here comes the 2020 MLB Angels draft…

…and it’s squirrelly AF.

This Wednesday, June 10th, at 4pm Pacific, the 2020 MLB First-Year Player Draft begins. It spans two days, and it’s going to be the weirdest effin’ draft this century. Arguably the weirdest ever, all told.

This is usually the time of year I crawl into my inner sanctum of spreadsheets and build a private hype house out of the past 12 months of nerdy prospect media subscriptions, deep-diving into a few hundred amateur player profiles, and stack ranking 200 or so players the Angels might select when minor organization celebs approach the podium. It’s my early summer sports data junkie Mar-a-Lago, and I typically begin posting teasers a few weeks prior to this.

But this is a tough time for draft devotees and farm enthusiasts. And it’s an uncertain time for the minor leagues, for any number of reasons. 

Collegiate programs have been stalled for months. Prep player showcases have been cancelled across the board. There’s less recent track record data to look at than ever. Drafted players are about to enter a highly uncertain developmental environment, as MiLB might not resume at all this season, and as many as 42 farm clubs were already targeted for elimination before the COVID-19 pandemic began. Many organizations have offered no assurances that their minor league players will be paid past June.

The Angels have been on the black end of the shit stick on all counts. The Burlington Bees and the Orem Owlz are among the 42 contraction candidates. The organization has given no promises to support their MiLB players beyond June (which they did oh-so-grudgingly), and they’ve recently laid waste to their ops division, and furloughed 70% of their scouting department, including all area scouts across the map. This is after a 2019 draft and subsequent offseason where the Angels summarily jettisoned their first round pick Will Wilson after a mere six months, an act that Fangraphs aptly describes as: “part of a Winter Meetings salary dump that in retrospect was a tip that Arte Moreno was starting to cry about the ops budget.”

If fact, let’s just tarry here for a second to hear out Eric Longenhagen (who spends every waking minute studying farm talent in Arizona) on what all this means for Angels scouting and development going forward:

All of baseball thinks Moreno’s mandate to furlough scouts was distasteful and cheap, and especially demoralizing given the timing, since the affected area scouts would have all been paid just once more before the draft. People in baseball seem less inclined to want to work for the Angels going forward.

Crap, that hurts.

If one were a young player considering an offer from the Angels after this week, you’re looking at a whole lot of question marks lined up from here to next spring. 

Then there’s the draft itself. Let’s consider the selection opportunities the Angels have before them:

#10, #82, #111, #141

And, um, that’s it. Four picks. The entirety of the Angels official 2020 draft, in a process that typically yields forty selections.

In fact, across all teams, there will be 160 selections in total. The most fortunate teams have six picks (14 teams in total), the least fortunate (NY Yankees) has three. The Angels are one of six clubs who have four selections due to signing free agents or draft pick forfeiture due to sign stealing penalties (Astros, Red Sox).

From end to end: #1 to #160. To put this in perspective, when looking retrospectively at recent draftees who have made an impact on the Angels club, consider David Fletcher. A 6th rounder from the 2015 draft, chosen #195 overall. Or Kole Calhoun, an 8th rounder from the 2010 draft, chosen with the #246th selection (four picks after the Colorado Rockies’ Corey Dickerson). Of course, notoriously, Albert Pujols was himself a 13th rounder, scooped up at #402. While draft value is highly concentrated at the top, there’s still a lot of hits among the 1200+ selections in a typical draft class.

But many of those selections beyond the first few rounds could look forward to overslot bonuses of up to $125k or more, and teams could shift their draft pool allotments around to coax certain players out of commitments. This year the maximum allotment for players beyond the 160th pick is $20k, so you’re looking at a lot of red shirts and JuCo players who may be desperate for opportunities. There are likely to be many creative deals to be had, but the Angels, with a diminished draft pool and a gutted staff, may not be among those to take advantage.

It was already going to be a lean season. With the signing of the top free agent hitter in Anthony Rendon this past offseason, the Angels forfeited their second-round selection (at #47) this time. For context, Griffin Canning was selected at #47 in 2017. In fact, the Angels have tended to do well in the second round historically: Brandon Marsh (#60), Patrick Corbin (#80), Tyler Chatwood (#74), John Lackey (#60). Nolan Arenado, Eddie Bane’s “one that got away” in the 2009 draft, was a #59 slot selection. Billy Eppler’s biggest Angels trade haul, Andrelton Simmons, was himself a 2010 second rounder at #70.

Pointing this out would amount to a special varietal of crocodile tears in a typical draft cycle. The Angels procured an excellent hitter in Rendon, and that would be the end of debate. It’s just that this is a draft one really wishes that Angels had a second-round selection, as it features the deepest collegiate class most scouts can remember in a generation, including a number of collegiate arms in the range of the 2nd and supplemental rounds that might be first round talents in a number of other draft classes. And heaven knows the Angels need pitching with upside.

Given the robust college crop, and the lack of incentives for prepsters to sign, this is a draft where it doesn’t make a ton of sense to draft prep talent beyond the first round or so – absent big money offers, the leverage is going to be with the high schoolers, who are likely to seek out both JuCo and 4-year college programs to wait out the moment, in hopes of better opportunities in the coming year(s). Signability is going to be a greater challenge than ever, and it’s also going to be a struggle for older college players to find playing time as younger talent floods collegiate programs, and a dwindling scholarship pool becomes even more competitive. 

So, yeah, things are pretty weird. There’s a whole lotta me that just wants to say fuckitall and watch what the Angels do with an emoji shrug and a small basic barware shot glass of emotional investment. It’s not like Angels ownership has invested much in the current process. From corona-themed furloughs to deferred stadium planning to the Pederson/Stripling debacle – running a healthy talent pipeline based in deep scouting and analytics seems to have moved well down the Angels big board of priorities. If there weren’t such intriguing players in the hopper, I’d be hesitant to nurse my drink.

But ever the faithful barkeeps, we’ll serve you up anyhow. This is day one of four days of Crashing the Pearly Gates draft coverage.

In tomorrow’s article, we’ll profile the top names within the Angels’ ‘zone of opportunity’ (picking at #10) across four types of player: collegiate and prep pitchers, outfield and infield positional talent. Meanwhile, we’ll also summarize the latest predictions from around the horn of prospect prognosticators.

On Wednesday, we’ll publish CtPG’s Consensus Big Board, covering the aggregate rankings of the top 50 players in the draft, and will follow along in the late afternoon as the countdown progresses to the Angels first round announcement.

On Thursday, we’ll monitor the Angels’ final three selections, with a round-up of the best remaining talent on the board, and what might be available as the Angels select in the 80-150 zone that afternoon. 

Stay tuned, and please join the conversation in the comments!

19 Comments
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2002heaven
Super Member
4 years ago

Reid Detmers, LHP, Louisville
GET HIM IF HE’S AVAILABLE DAMMIT!!! 😡
stop the HS OF’s and college C’s bullshit Eppler.

Eric_in_Portland
Legend
4 years ago

we’ll get into this tomorrow, I guess, but I didn’t get the warm feelings reading this about Patrick Bailey…

“Even if he doesn’t hit, Bailey provides enough defense to at least serve as a backup.”

2002heaven
Super Member
4 years ago

A first round pick on a backup isn’t acceptable. but then again billy eppler spent last years #1 pick Will Wilson to get rid of a throwaway failed FA disaster ( Zack Cozart ).

2002heaven
Super Member
4 years ago
Reply to  Turk's Teeth

I’m just super concerned that the catching position is in a free fall mode and won’t really recover anytime soon. This is a league wide sport phenomenon not just our own organizational shortcoming.
This is why I can’t support the drafting of a catcher above the 3rd RD, and besides it’s always been a grinder and gutty little overachiever position not a thoroughbred one.

John Henry Weitzel
Editor
Super Member
4 years ago

Arte being cheap is hurting the team as usual.

JackFrost
Super Member
4 years ago

Love the squirrel with the vodka bottle.

JackFrost
Super Member
4 years ago

They’re not really gonna take a catcher in the First Round, are they?

Let’s hope not. Billy really let us down last year by passing on some great pitching prospects in the early rounds. Hope it is not a repeat this year.

As for Arte and his shenanigans; I’ve never bought into the Arte hype. I always knew it was the result of good press that was the result of hiring good PR people,.

Then stupidly keeping Sosh around for years and years after it was obvious we needed to make a change. It is at the point now that I feel we have to win in SPITE of Arte. We sure won’t be winning because of him.

Eric_in_Portland
Legend
4 years ago
Reply to  JackFrost

if it weren’t for the history I’ve had with the Angels as a fan for 40+ years, and Mike Trout, and David Fletcher, and Shoehei Ohtani…heck, the players, I’d be hoping for a Portland franchise to start up so I could switch allegiance.

Which brings up a question. The owners are hardballing the players, wanting cuts after the previous cuts, refusing to open the books and just, in general, being blankety-blanks. They should have long ago worked out something just for both sides so players and owners go forward as partners. Not necessarily equal partners but at least working together. I would think that the owners are not unanimous in their hardballing ways. The question: do you think Arte is one of the hardliners?

Charles Sutton
Editor
Super Member
4 years ago

I’ve seen reports suggesting that he is. It was worded like “one of the most vocal about wanting further cuts”

Rahul Setty
Admin
Trusted Member
4 years ago

Oh absolutely, he’s one of the hardliners. If he’s adamant to cut baseball ops people and minor leaguers, what makes you think he’d want to pay players who make over 100x more?

steelgolf
Super Member
4 years ago

Which type of player will they take with their pick at #10? Toolsy “best athlete available”? Catcher who can’t stick at the position? Pitcher?

JackFrost
Super Member
4 years ago
Reply to  steelgolf

A defensive catcher, lol.

Rahul Setty
Admin
Trusted Member
4 years ago

Looking forward for what’s in store, TT!

Part of me wants to watch the Angels crash and burn in the draft as retribution for how they’ve treated their baseball ops and scouting staff, not to mention minor leaguers.

Mia
Legend
Mia
4 years ago

But…but…Joe Madden told us people wanted to work here again…

Rahul Setty
Admin
Trusted Member
4 years ago
Reply to  Mia

Lesigh.

Mia
Legend
Mia
4 years ago
Reply to  Rahul Setty

Not that it matters, it’s not like we are ever getting out of 2020.

Jeff Joiner
Editor
Legend
4 years ago

Nice. Arte’s short sightedness when it comes to developing talent is maddening. Year after year he has to plunk down huge money in free agency because he won’t invest smaller money into scouting, development, and ops.

H.T. Ennis
Admin
Super Member
4 years ago

Weird to have the draft without any baseball being played, and I’ll admit I have done very little research into prospects this season, but it’s always good to build up the farm system, I suppose!